Reviews

Christian academics continue to face a significant question when engaging in scholarship: Is scholarly pursuit incompatible with Christian thought as seems to be assumed by some academics today, or are academic enquiry and Christian faith mutually supportive? In this paper, a range of responses to this question from within the Christian community are navigated, and then firmly advocates the legitimacy of Christian intellectual enquiry in both the public and Christian academic domains. Core principles for scholarly engagement by Christian academics are identified and two possible intellectual scaffolds which are recognized in the secular community and which might prove attractive to Christian scholars are provided. Finally, several characteristics of what Christian scholarship might look like in the academy in the postmodern world of the 21st century are suggested.

 

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We present the results of a qualitative, phenomenological research study that explored the spiritual dynamics of 13 overseas student teachers. Overall, participants in our sample described spiritual growth on two levels. First, they related that spiritual development often followed an inside-out pattern. In explaining this phenomenon, students described how engagement in activities such as spiritual preparation (prior to departure), the maintenance of spiritual disciplines, and purposeful steps taken to grow in Christian character played supportive roles in their overall spiritual development while overseas. Conversely, participants also shared dynamics by which they were influenced spiritually from the outside in. Such facets included school environments as well as church interactions, through which participants reportedly developed both spiritual and social connections.


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Trends in Christian higher education indicate a growing interest in professional training programs that take Christian faith commitments and values seriously. This article explores one professional graduate program with secondary accreditation that attempts to be faithful to a Christian worldview while at the same time honoring the developments within its particular discipline. In a desire to practice what we preach, several key components of an intentionally developed curriculum will be described including isomorphic accountability, self-in-relation exploration, and mentoring. Some philosophical and theological foundations and pedagogical examples are offered. Finally, implications for graduate program development emphasize the need to attend to the language and processes of curriculum delivery and not just to the content.

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This study investigated the leadership behaviors of presidents of Christian colleges and universities in North America. Data were collected from the chief financial administrator, the chief student affairs administrator, and the chief academic administrator on the independent variables of transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership styles for the university president and the dependent variable of followers' job satisfaction. The data on the leadership behaviors consisted of five transformational leadership factors, three transactional leadership factors, and a single laissez-faire leadership and were collected using the Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire. This inquiry sought to discover to what degree transformational leadership, transactional leadership, and laissez-faire leadership are practiced by presidents at member colleges and universities of the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities. Second, the study attempted to identify the combination of transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership behaviors that are significant predictors of job satisfaction among followers. The research study has important implications for the field of leadership research and practitioners, particularly presidents of CCCU institutions and more generally for others in positions of leadership. Identifying specific leadership behaviors that predict followers' satisfaction can reduce absenteeism and employee turnover, and is potentially beneficial for leaders who develop and utilize these leadership behaviors for the benefit of their ins.

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